Home > Seminars > Reilly Lecture: Nanotechnology and Bioengineering in an Evolving Chemical Engineering World

Reilly Lecture: Nanotechnology and Bioengineering in an Evolving Chemical Engineering World

Start:

4/1/2015 at 1:00PM

End:

4/1/2015 at 2:00PM

Location:

Eck Visitors Center Auditorium

Host:

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Edward Maginn

Edward Maginn

VIEW FULL PROFILE Email: ed@nd.edu
Phone: 574-631-5687
Website: http://www.nd.edu/~ed/
Office: 182A Fitzpatrick Hall

Affiliations

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Dorini Family Professor of Energy Studies and Department Chair
College of Engineering Dorini Family Professor of Energy Studies and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
The research in our group focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of the link between the physical properties of materials and their chemical constitution. Much of our work is devoted to applications related to energy and the environment. The main tool we use is molecular simulation. In ...
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Nanotechnology and Bioengineering, have evolved out of chemical engineering  because of the need to address important societal problems. Emphasis in such areas has led to the solution of complex chemical engineering problems that required non-newtonian flows, non-ideal thermodynamics, multicomponent systems, macromolecular analysis and diagnostic/intelligent responsive systems. The introduction of these fields brought up also an emphasis on translational research, product engineering, development of devices/systems and processes and an associated emphasis on applications and commercialization. An unfortunate result of these changes was a shift of Chemical Engineering from fundamentals to applied sciences. I examine the underlying reasons for this shift, with emphasis on changes in societal needs in the 1970s to translational research that started in the late 1980s. I examine the impact of these changes on ChE education, including the academic shift towards applied sciences and the de-emphasis of fundamentals. We address  new  educational and research directions that will provide a corrective path towards convergence in Chemical Engineering.

Seminar Speaker:

Nicholas A. Peppas

Nicholas A. Peppas

University of Texas at Austin

Nicholas A. Peppas is the Cockrell Family Regents Chaired Professor in the Departments of Chemical, Biomedical Engineering and Pharmacy, Chairman of the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Institute of Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Regenerative Medicine of the University of Texas at Austin.  His work in biomaterials, polymer physics, drug delivery and bionanotechnology follows a multidisciplinary approach by blending modern molecular and cellular biology with engineering principles to design the next-generation of medical systems and devices for patient treatment. Over the past 40 years he has set the fundamentals and rational design of drug delivery systems  and developed models of drug and protein diffusion in controlled release devices and biological tissues. In 2012 he received the Founders Award of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), the highest recognition of the Academy, for these contributions to the field. Peppas is a member of the NAE, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, National Academy of Inventors, the National Academy of France, the Royal Academy of Spain, the Academy of Athens and the Academy of Texas.  He has been recognized with awards from AIChE (Founders Award, William Walker Award, Institute Lecture, Jay Bailey Award, Bioengineering Award, Materials Award), the Biomedical Engineering Society (Distinguished Scientist Award), the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (Galletti Award), the Society for Biomaterials (Founders, Clemson and Hall Awards), the Controlled Release Society (Founders, Heller and Eurand Awards) and other societies. In 2008, AIChE named him one of the One Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era. He is President of the International Union of Societies of Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Chair of the Engineering Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Past-Chair of the Council of BME Chairs. Previously, he served as President of SFB and the Controlled Release Society.  He is a fellow of AAAS, AIChE, APS, ACS, MRS, SFB, BMES, AIMBE, CRS, AAPS, and ASEE. He  has supervised the research of 100 PhDs and about 180 postdocs and graduate students. Peppas holds a Dipl. Eng. from the NTU of  Athens (1971), a Sc.D. from MIT (1973), and honorary doctorates from the Universities of Ghent, Parma, Athens, Ljubljana and Sichuan. 

Seminar Sponsors:

Reilly Lectureship

Initiated in 1958, the distinguished Reilly Lectureship is the oldest continuing endowed lectureship in chemical and biomolecular engineering in the United States. The lecture series is supported by the Peter C. Reilly Fund, which was established in 1945 in honor of the late Peter C. Reilly, a former University Trustee and recipient of an honorary LLD degree. Peter Reilly started the chemical company in Indianapolis that came to be called Reilly Industries and was a big supporter of Notre Dame.

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Sponsors

Reilly Lectureship

Initiated in 1958, the distinguished Reilly Lectureship is the oldest continuing endowed lectureship in chemical and biomolecular engineering in the United States. The lecture series is supported by the Peter C. Reilly Fund, which was established in 1945 in honor of the late Peter C. Reilly, a former University Trustee and recipient of an honorary LLD degree. Peter Reilly started the chemical company in Indianapolis that came to be called Reilly Industries and was a big supporter of Notre Dame.