Home > Seminars > Nicholas L. Abbott, Reilly Lecture Series: New Insights into Hydrophobic Interactions Encoded by Chemical Nanopatterns

Nicholas L. Abbott, Reilly Lecture Series: New Insights into Hydrophobic Interactions Encoded by Chemical Nanopatterns

Start:

4/18/2018 at 12:40PM

End:

4/18/2018 at 1:40PM

Location:

140 DeBartolo Hall

Host:

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Edward Maginn

Edward Maginn

VIEW FULL PROFILE Email: ed@nd.edu
Phone: 574-631-5687
Website: http://www.nd.edu/~ed/
Office: 182A Fitzpatrick Hall

Affiliations

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Dorini Family Professor of Energy Studies and Department Chair
College of Engineering Dorini Family Professor of Energy Studies and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
The research in our group focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of the link between the physical properties of materials and their chemical constitution. Much of our work is devoted to applications related to energy and the environment. The main tool we use is molecular simulation. In ...
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The structuring of water near non-polar molecular fragments or surfaces mediates cohesive interactions (so-called hydrophobic interactions) that underlie a broad range of biophysical, colloidal and materials-related phenomena. Substantial progress has been made during the past decade towards understanding hydrophobic interactions in simple model systems, but in most biological and technological contexts, non-polar domains are found in close proximity to polar and charged functional groups. We are using conformationally-stable b-amino acid oligomers, and single-molecule force measurements to elucidate hydrophobic interactions encoded by specific chemical nanopatterns. These measurements reveal, for example, that ions immobilized adjacent to non-polar domains can substantially increase or decrease the strength of hydrophobic adhesion, with the effect strongly dependent on the specific ion type. This understanding is providing a fresh starting point for molecular design in aqueous environments in a broad range of contexts.

Seminar Speaker:

Nicholas L. Abbott

Nicholas L. Abbott

University of Wisonsin-Madison

Nicholas Abbott received a Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical Engineering) from University of Adelaide, Australia in 1985, and a PhD in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the Chemistry Department of Harvard University from 1991-1993. His initial academic appointment was at University of California-Davis. He moved to the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1998 and served as Chairman of the department from 2009 to 2012. He is currently the Director of the Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, and the Sobota Professor and Hilldale Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering. He is a Fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science and a Member of the US National Academy of Engineering. He currently serves as Co-Editor-in-Chief of Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science.

Homepage: http://directory.engr.wisc.edu/che/faculty/abbott_nicholas

Seminar Sponsors:

Initiated in 1958, the distinguished Reilly Lectureship at Notre Dame is perhaps the oldest continuing endowed lectureship in chemical and biomolecular engineering in the United States. The lecture series is supported by the Peter C. Reilly Fund, which was established in 1945 in honor of the late Peter C. Reilly, a former University Trustee and recipient of an honorary LLD degree. Each Reilly speaker gives two talks in the lecture series; one for a general audience and a technical talk.

The Reilly Lectures now occur annually each spring.

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Sponsors

Initiated in 1958, the distinguished Reilly Lectureship at Notre Dame is perhaps the oldest continuing endowed lectureship in chemical and biomolecular engineering in the United States. The lecture series is supported by the Peter C. Reilly Fund, which was established in 1945 in honor of the late Peter C. Reilly, a former University Trustee and recipient of an honorary LLD degree. Each Reilly speaker gives two talks in the lecture series; one for a general audience and a technical talk.

The Reilly Lectures now occur annually each spring.